Dentist - Chicago
220-222 W. Huron, Suite 4002
Chicago, IL 60654
(312) 548-7579 (Office)
(312) 573-2032 (Fax)

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Posts for: November, 2017

By Reuben D. Collins, DDS
November 24, 2017
Category: Oral Health
Tags: toothache  
WhattoDoAboutYourChildsToothacheBeforeSeeingtheDentist

If your child begins complaining of tooth pain without an accompanying fever or facial swelling, it’s likely not an emergency. Still, you should have us check it—and the sooner the better if the pain persists or keeps your child up at night. There are a number of possible causes, any of which if untreated could be detrimental to their dental health.

Before coming in, though, you can do a cursory check of your child’s mouth to see if you notice any abnormalities. The most common cause for a toothache is tooth decay, which you might be able to see evidence of in the form of cavities or brown spots on the tooth’s biting surfaces. If you notice swollen or reddened gums around a tooth, this could be a possible sign of a localized area of infection known as an abscess. You should also ask your child if they fell or were hit in the mouth and look for any signs of an injury.

If you don’t see anything unusual, there may be another cause—stuck food like popcorn or candy lodged and exerting painful pressure on the gum tissue or tooth. You may be able to intervene in this case: gently floss around the affected tooth to try to dislodge any food particles. The pain may ease if you’re able to remove any. Even so, if you see abnormalities in the mouth or the pain doesn’t subside, you should definitely plan to come in for an examination.

In the meantime, you can help ease discomfort with a child-appropriate dose of ibuprofen or acetaminophen. An ice pack against the outside jaw may also help, but be careful not to apply ice directly to the skin. And under no circumstances rub aspirin or other painkiller directly on the gums—like ice, these products can burn the skin. If these efforts don’t help you should try to see us the same day or first thing the next morning for advanced treatment.

The main thing is not to panic. Knowing what to look for and when to see us will help ensure your child’s tooth pain will be cared for promptly.

If you would like more information on handling dental issues with your child, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “A Child’s Toothache.”


By Reuben D. Collins, DDS
November 16, 2017
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: cosmetic dentistry  
LookingGoodfortheHolidays

The holidays are a time for getting together with family and friends from near and far. The memories you make at these joyful celebrations are the ones you’ll treasure forever, but it can be hard to show good cheer if you’re not happy with the way your teeth look. If you’re keeping that grin under wraps, we may be able to perk up your smile with some quick and economical in-office treatments.

A professional teeth cleaning is one of the best values in dental care. In just minutes, we can remove the buildup of hardened tartar that can make your teeth look dull and yellowed. Tartar can also lead to tooth decay and gum disease—two kinds of trouble you don’t need! While you’re in the office, you will also have a thorough exam that could prevent minor issues like small cavities and bleeding gums from becoming more serious dental problems. When you leave, your teeth will look and feel sparkly clean.

If your smile doesn’t look as bright as you’d like, ask about teeth whitening treatments. In-office whitening is a safe and effective way to lighten your teeth up to 10 shades in a single visit! If you have more time, you can get similar results from a take-home kit that we can provide—one that’s custom-made just for you.

Are chips or cracks making your teeth look less than perfect? Cosmetic bonding could be the answer. Translucent, tooth-colored bonding material can be applied to your teeth to repair minor cracks, chips or spacing irregularities. This in-office procedure usually requires just one visit and can make a dramatic difference in your smile.

So as holiday celebrations draw near, why not give yourself a reason to smile? Contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation to see if professional teeth cleaning, teeth whitening or cosmetic bonding could give your smile some holiday sparkle! You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Important Teeth Whitening Questions Answered.”


By Reuben D. Collins, DDS
November 08, 2017
Category: Oral Health
Tags: dry mouth  
HowtoLessentheEffectsofChronicDryMouth

If you were asked to identify the number one mouth problem affecting dental health, what would you name? Toothaches? Poor hygiene? Jaw joint issues?

Believe it or not, the top issue among 15,000 respondents in a recent American Dental Association (ADA) survey was dry mouth. A full one-third of the respondents had experienced chronic lack of normal saliva flow; difficulty biting and tooth pain, took second and third place, respectively.

We’ve all experienced the discomfort of temporary dry mouth when we first wake up in the morning or after eating certain foods. But chronic dry mouth is much more serious with long-term effects on a person’s teeth and gum health. This is because among its other important properties, saliva helps neutralize enamel-softening mouth acid and restores minerals to enamel after acid contact. Without sufficient saliva flow you’re much more susceptible to dental disease.

While there are several causes for dry mouth, perhaps the most common is as a side effect to at least five hundred known medications. Because older people tend to take more medications than other age groups, dry mouth is an acute problem among people over 60 (a major factor for why dry mouth took the survey’s top health problem spot).

You can help ease dry mouth from medications by first asking your doctor about switching to alternative medications that don’t affect saliva production. If not, be sure to drink more water during the day and especially when you take your oral medication (a few sips before and after).

You can help your dry mouth symptoms from any cause by drinking more water, limiting your consumption of alcohol or caffeine, and avoiding tobacco products. You can also use substances that stimulate saliva flow—a common one is xylitol, an alcohol-based sugar that’s used as a sweetener in certain gums and candies. Not only does xylitol boost saliva flow it also inhibits the growth of bacteria and thus decreases your risk of disease.

And speaking of reducing bacteria and their effects, don’t neglect daily brushing and flossing. These habits, along with regular dental cleanings and checkups, will benefit you just as much as your efforts to reduce dry mouth in avoiding dental disease.

If you would like more information on treating common problems with teeth and gums, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.